Put a Ring On It

“I wish I could go in there like Moses and part the waters, and carry everyone to freedom on my ark.” said my friend Nadine.

I laughed and laughed at that. We were chatting about homeschoolers who won’t consider any curriculum that espouses or includes mention of any faith. That is a totally legitimate viewpoint and if it is your line in the sand, have at it. Go you!

Not all secular homeschoolers feel this way. People like to label themselves (despite not wanting to be put in a box, we often put ourselves in one) But why are we afraid to use curriculum as a tool, rather than an identity?

On one hand, it is convenient to slap a label on our “brand” of home education. If you meet at a park day and you introduce yourself as a Lit Based homeschooling family, your new friend won’t expect you to be as happy as she is over her new workbook program. And you know she’ll cringe at the sight of your box day. But aren’t we all lucky to have these choices? That’s part of the reason that most of us educate our kids at home, so that we have these choices in their education.

I’d go out on a limb and say that you might identify with whatever the curriculum company that you bought from tells you that they are. It’s quite a good sales technique and make no mistake, you are purchasing a product.

What they don’t mention is that their plans and books are just that. You can take them apart and use them any way you want to. Ever heard the phrase Every Tool’s a Hammer? I hadn’t until I read Adam Savage’s new book and it got me thinking about how curriculum is a tool, not a methodology.

Adam says things like, “don’t wait until everything is perfect to begin a project, and if you don’t have the exact right tool for a task, just use whatever’s handy.”

His book is about creating a culture of people who know and want to make things- “makers” It’s the same culture we’re in as homeschooling parents. His advice holds true for us all well.

I’d like to ask you to take some time to plan out where you’d like your kids’ education to end up. Do some reading about educational methods and take a good hard look at the kids you have, before you spend money on the latest box of homeschooling goodness. Don’t worry about the religious beliefs of whomever wrote it or is selling it.

We’re planning more posts about curriculum we like, why we like it, how it works, and why we can ignore any faith based elements that may be included in it. We hope you’ll stick around and see what Good Enough Homeschooling looks like for us.

JEN NAUGHTON and her husband share their 1930's era Chicago home with four sons and a daughter. A voracious reader, Jen reviews books before their release for dozens of publishers on her page: Windy City Reader. Jen also blogs (on WordPress!) about classical, mostly secular, home education at Good Enough Homeschool. In 2020 she will begin a new adventure teaching and traveling with her youngest son in their camper van. Follow their antics at Windy City Rover. You can find Jen misbehaving on social media on Twitter: @jennynau10 and Instagram: @windycityrover

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